Location

Seton Hall University

Event Website

http://www.shu.edu/academics/artsci/petersheim/

Start Date

18-4-2012 10:00 AM

End Date

18-4-2012 12:00 PM

Description

Unresolved conflict is a primary reason why nursing turnover rates are exceptionally high and job satisfaction is lacking within the profession. One of the driving factors in leading a decision to leave employment is a nurse’s relationship with peers and with the organization. Whether or not an infrastructure exists to resolve conflict is irrelevant if a nurse’s perception of organizational support is a barrier to utilization. As the population continues to age, hospitals and long term care facilities will see a surge in patients and an increased level of stress on an already strained system. Though conflict is unavoidable and can be productive in certain instances, the ability to successfully manage the process within the health care setting is a significant catalyst to a nurse’s decision to remain or leave employment. Departure typically results in higher costs for an organization in terms of recruitment, and jeopardizes patient outcomes via a break in the chain of care. Research has found a positive correlation between nursing job satisfaction and organizational commitment to conflict resolution. This paper analyzes issues that jeopardize job satisfaction, the responses that occur as a result of poor conflict management practices and concludes with a recommendation that outlines changes to leadership, structure and process that can be utilized to successfully manage conflict, improve employee confidence, increase job satisfaction and promote a healthier work environment leading to a restoration of confidence in organizational justice.

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Apr 18th, 10:00 AM Apr 18th, 12:00 PM

Conflict Resolution For Nursing Promoting Job Satisfaction and Respect for Organizational Justice

Seton Hall University

Unresolved conflict is a primary reason why nursing turnover rates are exceptionally high and job satisfaction is lacking within the profession. One of the driving factors in leading a decision to leave employment is a nurse’s relationship with peers and with the organization. Whether or not an infrastructure exists to resolve conflict is irrelevant if a nurse’s perception of organizational support is a barrier to utilization. As the population continues to age, hospitals and long term care facilities will see a surge in patients and an increased level of stress on an already strained system. Though conflict is unavoidable and can be productive in certain instances, the ability to successfully manage the process within the health care setting is a significant catalyst to a nurse’s decision to remain or leave employment. Departure typically results in higher costs for an organization in terms of recruitment, and jeopardizes patient outcomes via a break in the chain of care. Research has found a positive correlation between nursing job satisfaction and organizational commitment to conflict resolution. This paper analyzes issues that jeopardize job satisfaction, the responses that occur as a result of poor conflict management practices and concludes with a recommendation that outlines changes to leadership, structure and process that can be utilized to successfully manage conflict, improve employee confidence, increase job satisfaction and promote a healthier work environment leading to a restoration of confidence in organizational justice.

http://scholarship.shu.edu/petersheim-expo/petersheim-2012/Presentations/3

 

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